Curbing Maternal Mortality Rates

The millennium development goals (MDGs) are targets, which the world have set which are real time bound in nature in its quest to eliminating rising levels of poverty, through betterment of health services, provision of proper shelter, curbing of diseases and hunger eradication through promotion of education, reduction in gender parity and sustainable use of the environment (Kotch, 2013).

UN progress on Maternal Mortality Rates

Maternal death by definition is a woman’s death mainly during pregnancy, at childbirth or within six week after the birth of the child. It is the MDG5. It is clear from the UN website that as at 12th November 2015 the mortality rate had drastically fallen by 44% from 1990.

Secondly, many women have been able to receive antenatal care. Representing this percentagewise, the number of women who could not access to antenatal care has drastically reduced from 83% to 64%.

There have also been numerous crusades to encourage the professionalization of personnel giving the health services. In African countries, the number of women who give births under specialized personnel have increased drastically to 51%.

Meeting this goal will have many positive impacts on the world. First, it will ensure that the health of the mother and the child will highly be safeguarded. Secondly, no woman loose her life through the process of childbearing. It will also ensure that complications are detected earlier and hence advantageous to both the mother and child. This will in return leads to enhanced healthy practices all over the globe.

Suggestion to Reduce Maternal Mortality

There several measures that can be taken to reduce this problem. The expansion of proper health systems in the affected countries is critical. This in return will lead to free access to the healthcare by the mothers.

There is lack of qualified personnel to offer maternal health services. It is therefore in order to enhance professionalization of health services and this can be done through proper training. Moreover, cost effectiveness should be encouraged. Antenatal care should also be highly encouraged, as most women in the rural areas do not receive it. This includes immunization and screening test to detect complications (Ehiri, 2009).

Community mobilization is also of key importance. Some cultures are so primitive, which mainly prevents pregnant women from accessing healthcare during pregnancy. Moreover, more health information should be gathered by professional, which may aid in decision-making and policies formulations.