ENV- Additional Revision

Note; you didn’t corrected this question network models and network theories is a sure Comment by Vetter-Smith, Molly J: Again, you need to be more specific about which model or theory you are employing for your intervention.

Note: You didn’t corrected References Comment by Vetter-Smith, Molly J: Your references are not in correct APA format. Review APA style.

 

 

Adopting the outbreak investigation using the network models and network theories is a sure way to prevent food-borne threats compared to the standard public strategies or procedures that use tracings along the food shipping chains and case-control studies. These methods or interventions are biased in data collection and time-consuming. The network in this intervention program will capture the different transportation routes or transmission pathways that are the major points along the food production chain identified to result in food poisoning (Meyers, Newman, Martin et al., 2003). We have learned in the earlier sections that the best approach to preventing food-borne illness is understanding the mechanisms of food poisoning and developing strategies that can control such points along the chain of production. The technique employed will only require spatial information on the case reports that are regularly collected by the public health institutions. Therefore, the self-report survey will be analyzed in this case. Also important will be the model used for the food distribution networks. The approach that is based on the concept of replacing the geographic distance (conventional) with effective distance efficiently identifies the most probable epicenters that are the origins of the food-borne illness outbreaks. Comment by Vetter-Smith, Molly J: Again, you need to be more specific about which model or theory you are employing for your intervention. Comment by Vetter-Smith, Molly J: Explain this in more detail of what you mean by spatial information Comment by Vetter-Smith, Molly J: What type of questions will be asked on this self-report survey?

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

Epidemiology still finds a lot of challenges in handling infectious diseases such as the food-borne diseases. What makes the matter worse is the fact that these diseases are primarily caused by pathogens that evolve overtime into new generations and thus making it difficult to establish a conventional vaccine to prevent the outbreak of food-borne illness. While several interventions have been brought forward to prevent the outbreak of food-borne diseases, most of the approaches have not been effective enough in identifying the outbreak origin and then acting immediately to control any potential spread of the disease. Also, most of the methods adopted have been time-consuming. Adopting the outbreak investigation in the prevention of food-borne disease outbreak is more efficient than the other methods when there is a focus on the network models and networks theory, especially the new network-geometric approach that only require spatial information to identifying the outbreak origin based on the effective distance method.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References Comment by Vetter-Smith, Molly J: Your references are not in correct APA format. Review APA style.

Brockmann, D., & Helbing, D. (December 2013).The Hidden Geometry of Complex, Network- Driven Contagion Phenomena. Science;342(6164):1337-1342. [PubMed]

Shah D, Zaman T. Rumor centrality: A Universal Source Detector. In: Proceedings of the ACM SIGMETRICS’12. 199-210.

Jones TF, McMillian MB, Scallan E, Frenzen PD, Cronquist AB, Thomas S, Angulo F.J. (Feb 2007). A population-based estimate of the substantial burden of diarrhoeal disease in the United States; FoodNet, 1996-2003. Epidemiol Infect;135(2):293-301. PubMed PMID:17291364. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

Addis, M., & Sisay, D. (2015). A Review on Major Food-Borne Bacterial Illnesses. Journal of Tropical Diseases & Public Health, 2015.

McLinden, T., Sargeant, J. M., Thomas, M. K., Papadopoulos, A., & Fazil, A. (2014). Component Costs Of Foodborne Illness: A Scoping Review. BMC public health, 14(1), 1.

Rooney, R. M., Cramer, E. H., Mantha, S., Nichols, G., Bartram, J. K., Farber, J. M., & Benembarek, P. K. (2004). A Review Of Outbreaks Of Foodborne Disease Associated With Passenger Ships: Evidence For Risk Management. Public health reports, 119(4), 427. Szklo, M., & Nieto, F. J. (2014). Epidemiology: Beyond the Basics. Burlington, Mass: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

 

 

 

 

Adopting the outbreak investigation using the network models and network theories is a sure way to prevent food-borne threats compared to the standard public strategies or procedures that use tracings along the food shipping chains and case-control studies. These methods or interventions are biased in data collection and time-consuming. The network in this intervention program will capture the different transportation routes or transmission pathways that are the major points along the food production chain identified to result in food poisoning (Meyers, Newman, Martin et al., 2003). We have learned in the earlier sections that the best approach to preventing food-borne illness is understanding the mechanisms of food poisoning and developing strategies that can control such points along the chain of production. The technique employed will only require spatial information on the case reports that are regularly collected by the public health institutions. Therefore, the self-report survey will be analyzed in this case. Also important will be the model used for the food distribution networks. The approach that is based on the concept of replacing the geographic distance (conventional) with effective distance efficiently identifies the most probable epicenters that are the origins of the food-borne illness outbreaks. Comment by Vetter-Smith, Molly J: Again, you need to be more specific about which model or theory you are employing for your intervention. Comment by Vetter-Smith, Molly J: Explain this in more detail of what you mean by spatial information Comment by Vetter-Smith, Molly J: What type of questions will be asked on this self-report survey?

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

Epidemiology still finds a lot of challenges in handling infectious diseases such as the food-borne diseases. What makes the matter worse is the fact that these diseases are primarily caused by pathogens that evolve overtime into new generations and thus making it difficult to establish a conventional vaccine to prevent the outbreak of food-borne illness. While several interventions have been brought forward to prevent the outbreak of food-borne diseases, most of the approaches have not been effective enough in identifying the outbreak origin and then acting immediately to control any potential spread of the disease. Also, most of the methods adopted have been time-consuming. Adopting the outbreak investigation in the prevention of food-borne disease outbreak is more efficient than the other methods when there is a focus on the network models and networks theory, especially the new network-geometric approach that only require spatial information to identifying the outbreak origin based on the effective distance method.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References Comment by Vetter-Smith, Molly J: Your references are not in correct APA format. Review APA style.

Brockmann, D., & Helbing, D. (December 2013).The Hidden Geometry of Complex, Network- Driven Contagion Phenomena. Science;342(6164):1337-1342. [PubMed]

Shah D, Zaman T. Rumor centrality: A Universal Source Detector. In: Proceedings of the ACM SIGMETRICS’12. 199-210.

Jones TF, McMillian MB, Scallan E, Frenzen PD, Cronquist AB, Thomas S, Angulo F.J. (Feb 2007). A population-based estimate of the substantial burden of diarrhoeal disease in the United States; FoodNet, 1996-2003. Epidemiol Infect;135(2):293-301. PubMed PMID:17291364. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

Addis, M., & Sisay, D. (2015). A Review on Major Food-Borne Bacterial Illnesses. Journal of Tropical Diseases & Public Health, 2015.

McLinden, T., Sargeant, J. M., Thomas, M. K., Papadopoulos, A., & Fazil, A. (2014). Component Costs Of Foodborne Illness: A Scoping Review. BMC public health, 14(1), 1.

Rooney, R. M., Cramer, E. H., Mantha, S., Nichols, G., Bartram, J. K., Farber, J. M., & Benembarek, P. K. (2004). A Review Of Outbreaks Of Foodborne Disease Associated With Passenger Ships: Evidence For Risk Management. Public health reports, 119(4), 427. Szklo, M., & Nieto, F. J. (2014). Epidemiology: Beyond the Basics. Burlington, Mass: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

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