Final Project

I have a lenthy assignment due, but I have an identical assignment that has already been submitted to the class by my dear friend, and she received a pretty good grade for it.  So, feel free to pull from it, just do not copy directly becuase I need to get it through the plagerism checker.  So ideally, looking at 10 pages that need re-written in a master’s level.  The work is done, so just put it all together and avoid direct plagerism.

 

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Additional assignment previously completed to aid in formation of the new overall creation.

Project Template

 

 

Results Section of Walden Sports Inc. Scenario

Michael A. Leonard

Walden University

Job Attitudes, Measurements, and Change

IPSY 8579

Professor Deb Peck

July 23, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

Methods Section, Part 2

The three variables I have chosen for this week’s assignment to predict job attitudes in the Walden Sports, Inc. scenario are trust, perceived organizational support, and role conflict. According to the information given through out this class concerning Walden Sports, Inc., those employed by Walden Sports lack work motivation that can be linked to the acquisition of Earth Travelers (Laureate Education, 2012a).

Walden Sports, Inc. is experiencing low-performance from their employees, some examples include absenteeism, poor attendance at company sponsored social events, as well as increased turnover (Laureate Education, 2012a). Also, newer employees have formed a negative perception of the company within their short stint at Walden Sports due to the organization’s lack of support. Overall, the employees at Walden Sports have altered their behavior possibly because of the organizational changes. As their organizational consultant, I hope to diagnose the overlying cause and offer up techniques to help guide them in making some positive changes that will not only manage the employee dynamics and increase profitability at Walden Sports, Inc.

First Variable: Trust

Trust is an important factor in everyday life, it is a mix of feeling and rational thinking as defined by Lewis & Weigert (1985). Most importantly, trust in the workplace has been linked to increased levels of organizational performance and competitiveness (Vineburgh, 2010). When employees feel that their organization is not trustworthy, they tend to find ways to reduce their vulnerability such as reducing their performance (Culbert & McDonough, 1986). From the outside looking in, Walden Sports Inc. employees appear to have a feeling of mistrust toward their employer and their management teams. The trust variable shares a common thread with perceived organizational support in that if employees do not perceive a balanced working environment, it could affect their expectations and their level of trust in their employer (Celep & Yilmazturk, 2012). I believe that the Organizational Trust Inventory (OTI) will properly examine Walden Sports and their employee’s level of organizational trust. By its very definition, the Organizational Trust Inventory measures the level of trust within an organization (Cummings & Bromiley, 1996). The OTI has an internal validity of 0.84 (dimension 1), .78 (dimension 2), and .88 (dimension 3) respectively (Nyhan & Marlowe, 1997; Butler, 1991). The model is a 12-item, and 7-point Likert scale that inquiries on my organization conducts operations in an ethical manner and the organization listens to their employees, and the organization provides proper feedback to their employees.

Second Variable: Perceived Organizational Support (POS)

According to industrial and organizational psychology expert Dr. John Meyer, organizational commitment reflects loyalty and willingness to work toward organizational objectives that have been identified by the organization (Meyer, 1997). To measure perceived organizational support, I believe that the Survey of Perceived Organizational Support (SPOS) scale would be effective and will be used to assess just how well Walden employees think their organization supports them (Celep & Yilmazturk, 2012). The SPOS is a 36-item questionnaire which incorporates a 7-point Likert scale with 1=strongly disagree, and 7=strongly agree (Eisenberger, Jones, Aselage, & Sucharski, 2004). The survey requires employees to answer statements such as the organization provides all materials for employee success or the organization values my suggestions. The scale has a reliability coefficient of .93 on the long version and .89 on the short 8-item and on the original 36-item long version carries a very high internal validity being close to 1.00 (Eisenberger, Armeli, Rexwinkel, Lynch, & Rhoades, 2001).

Third Variable: Role Conflict

The role conflict variable occurs when employees experience incompatible work demands (Karkel & Frone, 1998). Some individuals may experience role conflict while working in a certain field that may be incompatible with their personal values or beliefs, such as working on certain days that may be reserved for religious practices (Karkel & Frone, 1998). The new Walden Sports employees found themselves working for an organization that was not the same one that was presented at the time of their hire (Laureate Education, 2012c). One individual was told that he could travel at least once a month so he could talk about the vacation spots to potential buyers and has yet to take one trip (Laureate Education, 2012c). Another employee was told that the company was like a big family and that may have been true at one point, but since she has been employed the organization has failed to live up to those remarks (Laureate Education, 2012c). These employees are working for an organization that has not lived up to their side of the expectations and some employees would rather work elsewhere but feel trapped in their current position Laureate Education, 2012b). One question that each employee may be asking themselves is can I work for an organization that does not do what they say they will? This scale is composed of 14-items of which eight measures the strength of the role conflict variable while the others measure role ambiguity on a 5-point Likert scale (1=totally disagree to 5=totally agree) (Rizzo, House, & Lirtzmam, 1970). The Cronbach’s Alpha indicates coefficient of .65 (Palomino & Frezatti, 2015; Rizzo, House, & Lirtzmam, 1970). Walden employees will be asked statements such as I would prefer to work for another company or My organization keeps their commitments to their employees.

 

Results Section

155 employees at Walden Sports Inc. were surveyed regarding their job attitude. Measured quantities included job satisfaction “JS” overall, which was subdivided into AC (affective commitment), NC (normative commitment), CC (continuance commitment) and JI (job involement. Variables leading to these attitudes were identified as TR (trust), POS (perceived organizational support, and RC (role conflict) at the company. Variables were quantified along a 7-point scale as per Likert, with 1 for strong disagreement, up to 7 for strong agreement. This helped determine which variables were most significant. All antecedents turn out to be reliable in predicting job attitude, with affective commitment (AC) ranking highest with a correlation of (α = 0.956) (see Table 1). Cronbach’s alpha for RC (7 items; α = .924), POS (9 items; α = .892) and TR (7 items; α = .952), are all also highly correlated; these precursors do indeed predict job attitudes.

In fact, all the measured antecedents exceeded the usual reliability range, usually suggested as an alpha beyond about .7 to .8. AC (6 items; α = .956), NC (6 items; α = .931), CC(6 items; α = .933), and JI (6 items; α = .944) all showed high reliability.

Table I

Correlations of mean measurements with precursor variables

  JobSat AC NC CC JI RC POS TR Mean Std Deviation Alpha
JobSat Pearson Correlation 1 .657** .529** .356** .477** -.211** .580** .511** 3.5742 1.54141 .951
  Sig. (2-tailed)   .000 .000 .000 .000 .008 .000 .000
  N 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155
AC Pearson Correlation .657** 1 .621** .397** .484** -.214** .530** .533** 3.5505 1.59956 .956
  Sig. (2-tailed) .000   .000 .000 .000 .008 .000 .000
  N 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155
NC Pearson Correlation .529** .621** 1 .545** .493** .041 .468** .490** 3.6753 1.59509 .931
  Sig. (2-tailed) .000 .000   .000 .000 .614 .000 .000
  N 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155
CC Pearson Correlation .356** .397** .545** 1 .269** .046 .248** .387** 4.0237 1.68897 .933
  Sig. (2-tailed) .000 .000 .000   .001 .571 .002 .000
  N 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155
JI Pearson Correlation .477** .484** .493** .269** 1 -.070 .452** .364** 3.2358 1.41264 .944
  Sig. (2-tailed) .000 .000 .000 .001   .387 .000 .000
  N 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155
RC Pearson Correlation -.211** -.214** .041 .046 -.070 1 -.231** .041 4.1819 1.23632 .924
  Sig. (2-tailed) .008 .008 .614 .571 .387   .004 .609
  N 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155
POS Pearson Correlation .580** .530** .468** .248** .452** -.231** 1 .621** 3.9434 1.21830 .892
  Sig. (2-tailed) .000 .000 .000 .002 .000 .004   .000
  N 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155
TR Pearson Correlation .511** .533** .490** .387** .364** .041 .621** 1 3.6461 1.32614 .952
  Sig. (2-tailed) .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .609 .000  
  N 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155
**. Correlation is 2-tailed and significant at the 0.01 level

 

Looking at the survey questions themselves, of the N=155 Walden Sports employees surveyed, a minority (25%) have low job satisfaction (JS1) and 20% feel no emotional connection to the organization (AC3). About the same proportion (23%) feels forced to stay with the company out of obligation (NC6). One focus group member mentions that Walden Sports helped pay for her degree. 18.1% felt that their pledge to the organization was partly due to normative commitment (NC4). Some (21%) feel virtually trapped at Walden (CC4), and about the same number (20%) feel their resources would be lost upon leaving (CC5).

About three quarters of employees (74%) (JI4) are not obsessively involved in the workplace, and 80% agree that work is not the highest priority in life (JI6).

Pearson product-moment coefficient (Frankfort-Nachmias and Leon-Guerrero, 2007) shows how each variable correlates with its antecedent (Table 1) to show which variables strongly predict attitudes toward the job. Correlation value of .6 to .8 is considered to be predictive (Field, 2013). There are moderately acceptable positive correlations between the POS and JobSAT survey results (r(155) = .580, p = .00), and between POS and AC (r(155) = .530, p = .00) which is consistent with Arshadi & Hayavi, (2013) indicating that there’s a significant correlation between perceived organizational support and job satisfaction, and between perceived organizational support and affective commitment.

Overall (Table 1) the survey shows a tendency toward lack of satisfaction with the company. POS (M=3.9434, SD=1.21830) reveals, for example, that many respondents ‘slightly disagreed’ on survey questions, while deviation shows that most responded between 2.72 and 5.16 or moderately disagree and slightly agree.

Table II

Frequency Tabulations

  Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent
JSI: All in all, I am satisfied with my job
 

Valid

 

1

 

15

 

9.7

 

9.7

 

9.7

  2 39 25.2 25.2 34.8
  3 38 24.5 24.5 59.4
  4 26 16.8 16.8 76.1
  5 17 11.0 11.0 87.1
  6 16 10.3 10.3 97.4
  7 4 2.6 2.6 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
JS2: In general, I like my job
 

Valid

 

1

 

14

 

9.0

 

9.0

 

9.0

  2 25 16.1 16.1 25.2
  3 26 16.8 16.8 41.9
  4 44 28.4 28.4 70.3
  5 14 9.0 9.0 79.4
  6 26 16.8 16.8 96.1
  7 6 3.9 3.9 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
JS3: In general, I like working for this company
 

Valid

 

1

 

17

 

11.0

 

11.0

 

11.0

  2 28 18.1 18.1 29.0
  3 30 19.4 19.4 48.4
  4 36 23.2 23.2 71.6
  5 19 12.3 12.3 83.9
  6 21 13.5 13.5 97.4
  7 4 2.6 2.6 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
 

AC1: I would be very happy to spend the rest of my career at this company

 

Valid

 

1

 

26

 

16.8

 

16.8

 

16.8

  2 17 11.0 11.0 27.7
  3 23 14.8 14.8 42.6
  4 26 16.8 16.8 59.4
  5 28 18.1 18.1 77.4
  6 28 18.1 18.1 95.5
  7 7 4.5 4.5 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
AC2: I feel part of the “family” with this company
 

Valid

 

1

 

21

 

13.5

 

13.5

 

13.5

  2 22 14.2 14.2 27.7
  3 33 21.3 21.3 49.0
  4 24 15.5 15.5 64.5
  5 22 14.2 14.2 78.7
  6 28 18.1 18.1 96.8
  7 5 3.2 3.2 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
AC3: I feel “emotionally attached” to this company
 

Valid

 

1

 

31

 

20.0

 

20.0

 

20.0

  2 29 18.7 18.7 38.7
  3 23 14.8 14.8 53.5
  4 27 17.4 17.4 71.0
  5 20 12.9 12.9 83.9
  6 19 12.3 12.3 96.1
  7 6 3.9 3.9 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
AC4: I feel a strong sense of belonging to this company
 

Valid

 

1

 

21

 

13.5

 

13.5

 

13.5

  2 29 18.7 18.7 32.3
  3 27 17.4 17.4 49.7
  4 30 19.4 19.4 69.0
  5 22 14.2 14.2 83.2
  6 20 12.9 12.9 96.1
  7 6 3.9 3.9 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
AC5: This organization has a great deal of personal meaning for me
 

Valid

 

1

 

29

 

18.7

 

18.7

 

18.7

  2 31 20.0 20.0 38.7
  3 33 21.3 21.3 60.0
  4 26 16.8 16.8 76.8
  5 13 8.4 8.4 85.2
  6 17 11.0 11.0 96.1
  7 6 3.9 3.9 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
AC6: I really feel as if this organization’s problems are my own
 

Valid

 

1

 

24

 

15.5

 

15.5

 

15.5

  2 21 13.5 13.5 29.0
  3 25 16.1 16.1 45.2
  4 36 23.2 23.2 68.4
  5 23 14.8 14.8 83.2
  6 20 12.9 12.9 96.1
  7 6 3.9 3.9 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
NC1: I feel obligation to remain with this company
 

Valid

 

1

 

35

 

22.6

 

22.6

 

22.6

  2 14 9.0 9.0 31.6
  3 22 14.2 14.2 45.8
  4 39 25.2 25.2 71.0
  5 29 18.7 18.7 89.7
  6 12 7.7 7.7 97.4
  7 4 2.6 2.6 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
NC2: I would feel guilty if I left this company now
 

Valid

 

1

 

37

 

23.9

 

23.9

 

23.9

  2 21 13.5 13.5 37.4
  3 19 12.3 12.3 49.7
  4 29 18.7 18.7 68.4
  5 27 17.4 17.4 85.8
  6 15 9.7 9.7 95.5
  7 7 4.5 4.5 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
NC3: The company deserves my loyalty
 

Valid

 

1

 

23

 

14.8

 

14.8

 

14.8

  2 16 10.3 10.3 25.2
  3 18 11.6 11.6 36.8
  4 28 18.1 18.1 54.8
  5 20 12.9 12.9 67.7
  6 35 22.6 22.6 90.3
  7 15 9.7 9.7 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
NC4: I would not leave this company right now because I have a sense of obligation to the people in it
 

Valid

 

1

 

26

 

16.8

 

16.8

 

16.8

  2 19 12.3 12.3 29.0
  3 15 9.7 9.7 38.7
  4 29 18.7 18.7 57.4
  5 29 18.7 18.7 76.1
  6 28 18.1 18.1 94.2
  7 9 5.8 5.8 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
NC5: Even if it were to my advantage, I do not feel it would be right to leave my organization now
 

Valid

 

1

 

34

 

21.9

 

21.9

 

21.9

  2 23 14.8 14.8 36.8
  3 27 17.4 17.4 54.2
  4 31 20.0 20.0 74.2
  5 18 11.6 11.6 85.8
  6 16 10.3 10.3 96.1
  7 6 3.9 3.9 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
NC6: I owe a great deal to this organization
 

Valid

 

1

 

30

 

19.4

 

19.4

 

19.4

  2 10 6.5 6.5 25.8
  3 17 11.0 11.0 36.8
  4 26 16.8 16.8 53.5
  5 35 22.6 22.6 76.1
  6 27 17.4 17.4 93.5
  7 10 6.5 6.5 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
CC1: It would be hard for me to leave this company right now, even if I wanted to
 

Valid

 

1

 

13

 

8.4

 

8.4

 

8.4

  2 18 11.6 11.6 20.0
  3 16 10.3 10.3 30.3
  4 29 18.7 18.7 49.0
  5 29 18.7 18.7 67.7
  6 19 12.3 12.3 80.0
  7 31 20.0 20.0 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
CC2: Too much of my life would be disrupted if I decided I wanted to leave this company right now
 

Valid

 

1

 

24

 

15.5

 

15.5

 

15.5

  2 18 11.6 11.6 27.1
  3 21 13.5 13.5 40.6
  4 27 17.4 17.4 58.1
  5 29 18.7 18.7 76.8
  6 14 9.0 9.0 85.8
  7 22 14.2 14.2 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
CC3: Right now, staying with this company is a matter of necessity as much as desire
 

Valid

 

1

 

22

 

14.2

 

14.2

 

14.2

  2 19 12.3 12.3 26.5
  3 15 9.7 9.7 36.1
  4 21 13.5 13.5 49.7
  5 31 20.0 20.0 69.7
  6 21 13.5 13.5 83.2
  7 26 16.8 16.8 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
 

CC4: I feel that I have too few options to consider leaving this company

 

Valid

 

1

 

28

 

18.1

 

18.1

 

18.1

  2 19 12.3 12.3 30.3
  3 22 14.2 14.2 44.5
  4 34 21.9 21.9 66.5
  5 19 12.3 12.3 78.7
  6 13 8.4 8.4 87.1
  7 20 12.9 12.9 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
CC5: One of the few negative consequences of leaving this organization would be the scarcity of available resources
 

Valid

 

1

 

24

 

15.5

 

15.5

 

15.5

  2 14 9.0 9.0 24.5
  3 24 15.5 15.5 40.0
  4 31 20.0 20.0 60.0
  5 32 20.6 20.6 80.6
  6 17 11.0 11.0 91.6
  7 13 8.4 8.4 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
CC6: If I had not already put so much of myself into this organization, I might consider working elsewhere
 

Valid

 

1

 

28

 

18.1

 

18.1

 

18.1

  2 18 11.6 11.6 29.7
  3 19 12.3 12.3 41.9
  4 29 18.7 18.7 60.6
  5 21 13.5 13.5 74.2
  6 17 11.0 11.0 85.2
  7 23 14.8 14.8 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
JI1: The major satisfaction in my life comes from my job
 

Valid

 

1

 

34

 

21.9

 

21.9

 

21.9

  2 36 23.2 23.2 45.2
  3 33 21.3 21.3 66.5
  4 18 11.6 11.6 78.1
  5 21 13.5 13.5 91.6
  6 1 .6 .6 92.3
  7 11 7.1 7.1 99.4
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
JI2: The most important things that happen to me involve my work
 

Valid

 

1

 

30

 

19.4

 

19.4

 

19.4

  2 31 20.0 20.0 39.4
  3 22 14.2 14.2 53.5
  4 33 21.3 21.3 74.8
  5 27 17.4 17.4 92.3
  6 11 7.1 7.1 99.4
  7 1 .6 .6 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
JI3: I’m really a perfectionist about my work
 

Valid

 

1

 

21

 

13.5

 

13.5

 

13.5

  2 28 18.1 18.1 31.6
  3 33 21.3 21.3 52.9
  4 31 20.0 20.0 72.9
  5 27 17.4 17.4 90.3
  6 10 6.5 6.5 96.8
  7 5 3.2 3.2 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
JI4: I live, eat, and breathe my job
 

Valid

 

1

 

25

 

16.1

 

16.1

 

16.1

  2 22 14.2 14.2 30.3
  3 40 25.8 25.8 56.1
  4 30 19.4 19.4 75.5
  5 17 11.0 11.0 86.5
  6 16 10.3 10.3 96.8
  7 5 3.2 3.2 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
JI5: I am very much involved personally with my work
 

Valid

 

1

 

21

 

13.5

 

13.5

 

13.5

  2 29 18.7 18.7 32.3
  3 38 24.5 24.5 56.8
  4 29 18.7 18.7 75.5
  5 28 18.1 18.1 93.5
  6 8 5.2 5.2 98.7
  7 2 1.3 1.3 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  
JI6: Most things in life are not more important than work
 

Valid

 

1

 

31

 

20.0

 

20.0

 

20.0

  2 30 19.4 19.4 39.4
  3 31 20.0 20.0 59.4
  4 31 20.0 20.0 79.4
  5 21 13.5 13.5 92.9
  6 5 3.2 3.2 96.1
  7 6 3.9 3.9 100.0
  Total 155 100.0 100.0  

 

 

Reference:

 

Arshadi, N., & Hayavi, G., (2013). The effect of perceived organizational support on affective commitment and job performance: Mediating role of OBSE. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 84, 739-743

Field, A., (2013). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS statistics (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications Ltd

Frankfort-Nachmias, C., & Leon-Guerrero, A., (2011). Social statistics for a diverse society (6th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press, an Imprint of SAGE Publications, Inc.

 

 

 

Running Head: Job satisfaction and involvement

8

Job satisfaction and involvement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Job Satisfaction and Involvement

Michael A. Leonard

Walden University

Job Attitudes, Measurement, and Change

IPSY 8579

Professor Deborah Peck

 

 

 

 

The primary motive of this review is to strategically identify and evaluate factors contributing to job satisfaction and involvement (or lack thereof) as derived from a job diagnostic survey. The following will propose two instruments useful for the utilization of information gathering and the determination of productive behavior in the Walden Sports scenario.

Firstly, it is important to define what is meant by “job attitudes.” An attitude, as explained by Olson and Zanna (1993), is a psychological tendency expressed by evaluating a particular entity with some degree of favor or disfavor. Job attitudes, thereby, are collections of employee feelings toward assigned workplace duties (Judge & Kammeyer-Mueller, 2012). These responsibilities are visualized mentally in two distinct ways. The first is through the impression of adequate job satisfaction, which includes a thorough overview of employee thoughts as per what is required of them (Harrison, 2006). The second is through a complex assessment of job characteristics; these include, a employee’s salaries, their working condition in the organization, and the prospective opportunities associated with the ultimate attainment of the job title (Harrison, 2006). The work opportunity develops an employee’s global job characteristics in the organization, its working environment, a practical inclination, and its accumulated responsibilities required of them (Gillespie et al., 2016). Different job characteristics are accomplice within several levels of comfort within each global position attribute (Judge & Kammeyer-Mueller, 2012).

Employee or job satisfaction, according to most researchers, is the measure of feelings on whether or not the employee is content with their job requirements (Thompson, 2012). For the success of an organization, there is a desire to ensure that there is a mutual and healthy relationship between the organization and the workers that are committed to its success and profitability. A company’s expansion, through the formation of new departments, increases their target market, contributing to greater potential for success. A satisfying or an optimistic emotional reward that results from the assessment of an employee’s job description was a definition coined by Locke (1976). Job satisfaction, on the contrary, involves the utilization of multi-dimensional psychological feedbacks of workers about their evaluative, behavioral, and emotional components (Hulin, & Judge, 2003). Organizational commitment typically means an psychologically-driven and/or personally-motivated attachment to a particular institution and its primary purpose of revealing the improved feelings of an employee. Consecutively, it foresees work variables that are inclusive in job performance, turnover results, and the citizenship nature.

Walden Sports is a fully functional sports company and has undergone major transformations in the recreational sporting sector. Walden Sports, approximately 12 years after its establishment, has reported increases in sales at 1.4 million USD annually with a gross profit of roughly 2.0 million USD (Laureate Inc, 2012). The success of the company grew rapidly and exponentially, with a CEO unprepared for such growth, which brought with it a sharp decrease in the productivity and a rise in employees missing working days or taking unapproved leaves and sick days. The CEO stated in a general meeting that employees appeared less satisfied with their job description responsibilities as compared to when they first joined their payroll, likely because of a seeming increase in stress and responsibility. The CEO further emphasized how employees were not attending activities aimed at boosting morale support in the organization, or perhaps, that those activities were not appealing enough for them to attend (2012). Job attitudes typically fall into three sub-groups: the cognitive, the behavioral, and the affective. The cognitive component encompasses the opinionated segment of an attitude while the behavioral component includes the intentions the individual possesses that compel them to behave in a particular way. The affective component includes the feeling or emotion segments of an approach. Job attitudes, therefore, includes employee engagements, perceived organizational support, satisfaction and involvement, and organizational commitment. These attitudes play a vital role is to ensure the success or failure of an organization. If the information obtained is pessimistic in nature, which is through poor employee involvements and dedication in their work only reveals facts of the organization lagging behind on proper communication methods between staff and lack of diversity, teamwork. It is necessary for the CEO of the company to target all three of these sub-groups, the cognitive, behavioral, and affective, if Walden Sports is to save its employee moral and improve its work productivity.

One option is for Walden Sports to incorporate the use of a Descriptive Job Index. The JDI is a traditional measure of job satisfaction that contains five subscales. The JDI, through the systematic scale-reduction technique, can be applied to a sample that determines items preserved in every scale. JDI also includes motivational strategies to utilize involvements in organizational activities that transpire on a day-to-day basis (Gillespie et al., 2009). However, JDI is rarely used for it is a complex model in the analysis of job satisfaction.

Another option is the employment of a Job Satisfactory Survey. A JSS is a post measurement instrument that is designed solely to provide information on employee happiness in their current job description role. The JSS usually consists of questionnaires used in the determination of a job’s “bliss” and overall satisfaction. The JSS research tool was developed with a primary idea of giving a methodological guidance that could evaluate variables theoretically outlined through their numbers (Van Saane, 2003). It assesses job satisfaction for both depressed and dissatisfied workers, as well as highly satisfied employees (Spector, 1994).

The JSS, however, is considered the most complicated model, yet it fails to reveal which employee’s services hinder human services in general. Most scientists disregard this type of method including Cherniss and Egnatois (1978) as it is unclear how most of the studied variables associate well with job performance (Locke, 1976). In human offered services, there exists the availability of proof that indicates how an employee’s satisfaction affects their overall performance and their outcome.

The JSS job satisfactory-tool is utilized mainly during transitions and reformations that aid in the improvement of its usage. The stated satisfactory determinant tool measures an employee’s morale support and satisfaction in the daily operational activities of the organization. This satisfaction, in turn, has an impact on the inter-relationships between the agencies and staff. A class of variables is essential as this instrument includes the personal reactions of the employees to their jobs and their work responsibilities on a large scale.

During the survey, all relevant data collected through the utilization of JCC was divided into sample groups that represented a single administration and one non-human service that revealed discriminatory and convergent validity. Data questions used in the data analysis, collection, included observational strategies, means and variances scale for determining job descriptions, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). The primary purpose of the job survey satisfactory tool ensured for the determination and identification of relevant sources before its aftermath of the cultures that reigned in the organization.

After using the questionnaires to get information from the population set by use of survey methods which is first-hand knowledge achieved with no bias. The study categorized into three major sections with each being responsible for all the necessary job satisfaction ways in the analysis that builds a comprehensive result. The primary purpose of the utilization of the questionnaire to the sampled mean is to cover in-depth information obtained during the survey.

The printed questionnaires contain questions that have yes or no options. The overall sampled mean number of employees determined through an unbiased procedure that aimed at giving out appropriate and correct information. The average number used in the establishment and for a summary of measures of the potency of all the relevant work conducted by the organization grouped into three major scale levels and this was made possible through the supervisory management that was requested for determination to rate the employees.

Scoring cards could also be used together with questionnaires. All the relevant data would be collected and summarized into columns of autonomy, agents’ feedback, and the obtained information summarized under a general job satisfaction overview. A scoreboard is another useful tool that allows for a clear and precise understanding of employee staff through their job performance that contributes to the growth and development of a particular organization. The scoreboard, however, needs to be balanced and involves processes that ensure for a consolidated meeting of all the speculated goals. The procedures include an accurately translated vision, proper planning, correct learning and feedback, and the appropriate processes of communication. The stated procedural strategies assimilated with all the current existing managerial practices that providing for all the relevant and necessary information that insures for a proper achievement of long-term goals.

This strategic information obtained from organization about its projected goals provides for a better understanding of what might hinder the success of the company in the future. Changes could thereby be made possible through the establishment of employee requirements that provides for a clear and easily understandable long-term adjustment. For a proper strategic plan, there is a dire need of for an excellent communication and linkage which promises for the teaching of balanced scorecard process. This helps the overall stated mission purpose of the company. Proper planning allows for an efficient alignment of an organization’s financial dynamism, providing a well-balanced scorecard that offers an explicit allocation of resources and cumulative agreement on significant decisions that together ensure that all organizational goals are met.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Gillespie,M., Balzer,W., Brodke, M., Garza, M., Gerbec, E., Gillespie, J., Gopalkrishnan, P., Lengyel, J., Sliter, K., Sliter, M., Withrow, S., & Yugo, M. (2016) “Normative measurement of job satisfaction in the US”, Journal of Managerial Psychology, Vol. 31 Issue: 2, pp.516-536, https://doi.org/10.1108/JMP-07-2014-0223

Harrison, D.A (2006). How Important are Job Attitudes? Meta-Analytic Comparisons of Integrative Behavioral Outcomes and Time Sequences. Academy of Management Journal. Vol. 49, No. 2. Pp 305-325

Judge, Timothy A. & Kammeyer-Mueller, John D., (January 2012). Annual Review of Psychology, Vol. 63, pp. 341-367, 2012. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1982985 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-psych-120710-100511

Laureate Education Inc (2012) Introducing Walden Sports Inc, Baltimore

Locke E (1997) the Nature and Causes of job satisfaction, Organizational Psychology (Edition) pg: 1297-1349

Spector P (1994) Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS) Retrieved March 25th, 2007 from

Van Saane N, Sluiter J, & FringsDresen (2003) Reliability and validity of instruments measuring job satisfaction 53(3) 200

 

Looks easy, well I failed this class before due to a professor on here, so I am repeating the same assignment….

 

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